Archive | Hostels RSS feed for this section

Mokshadharma, a house by the river, and Cheeky Monkey Yoga in Chiang Khong

13 Sep

A few days ago we were cycling along the Mekong River path when Dom pointed out a small sign attached to the side of a building on stilts which read, ‘Yoga’.  Curious, we climbed the wooden steps leading to an entrance, only to be greeted by a Thai lady who pointed under the building and said, “That way”.

The space underneath felt like walking through someone’s cluttered garage with lots of doors on the right hand side, and hammocks hanging from beams in the ceiling. The garage then opened out onto an overgrown garden area, and a series of steps with metal bottle tops embedded into the concrete like a mosaic.

Once at the bottom, we finally came to a sign attached to a door which read, ‘Cheeky Monkey Yoga- This is it’. After several knocks and an overly excited greeting from 2 dogs with big ears, a smiling lady in her late 50’s/ early 60’s opened the door,  introduced herself as Diane (or Mokshadharma – her Yogi name)  and invited us in.

Di-Mokshadharma’s home/ yoga studio was a beautiful, airy, open plan space which looked out onto the whole of the Mekong River and Laos. She explained that her and her husband had moved from Australia 5 years ago to live in Chiang Khong, and she’d been teaching yoga for 20 years, but now offered 1-1 classes for travellers.

We visited again yesterday to do a class in the evening. Bamboo mats and embroidered cushions had been placed out by the large open window overlooking the river at sunset, and  candles flickered around the rest of the room. The yoga was incredibly relaxing and one of the best classes I’ve had. However, equally as interesting was how Di-Mokshadharma and her husband came to live there.

I had no idea that it wasn’t possible for non-Thai residents to own property in Thailand. Di-Mokshadharma and her husband’s home did not technically belong to them. The garage like room we walked through on the way there was actually part of a hostel, and 5 years ago the space that is now their home had been neglected and was pretty uninhabitable.

With permission from the hostel owners, they then did up the neglected section which is now not only their home and yoga studio, but also a space where they voluntarily teach local kids in the area English. In return, they only pay the relevant bills for their section of the property, and are involved with other developmental work in the community.

I’m not really sure what you’d call this- Perhaps just a friendly agreement? I’ve certainly never heard of anything quite like it, but I love the idea.

Advertisements

Thailand’s worst hostel room

1 Sep

We arrived in Chiang Rai 2 days ago and thought we’d check out the Lonely Planet’s ‘Top Pick’ hostel- The Easy House. They only had one room left. This is why we decided not to stay:

– The bed consisted of 3 old stained mattresses (looked like they were found in a skip), diping dramatically in the middle so your feet were raised once lying on it.

– There were huge holes in the sheets.

– Insects were crawling on the bed.

– There were actual holes in the roof. And it still rains in the night.

– The windows were boarded up.

– There was no lock on the door.

– There was a gap in the blinds covering the window from next door, so when the people from next door opened their cupboard, they’d be able to peek through into our room.

– The disgusting painting hung up wonkily on the wall only succeeded in making the room more comical.

After a 15 minute walk up the road we found a lovely hostel for an even cheaper price.